Palm Beach Real Estate News

If you’re getting ready to sell your home, it makes sense that you’d want to renovate and fix any lingering problems as a way to get top dollar for your home. But if you want your renovations to help your home sale—and not hurt it—you need to ensure you have the necessary permits.

According to a recent article from Redfin, there are a number of home renovation and improvement projects—including fence installations and repairs, window installations, plumbing and electrical work, structural changes, heating maintenance, and additions or remodels—that require a permit from the city government. When you obtain these permits, the changes and improvements you make to your home are inspected by the city to ensure they’re up to code. Once they’re approved, they are put on official record.

Why is this important? When you sell your home, both buyers and lenders will want to know that any changes, improvements, renovations, or modifications made to the home were done safely and comply with all relevant building codes. They’ll ask for the city permits as proof—and if you don’t have them, it can sink the sale.

The Takeaway:

If you’re renovating your home, make sure you have the right permits. Otherwise, when you go to sell, you may have a serious problem on your hands.

Posted by Heather Smith on October 8th, 2019 2:17 PM

There’s a lot that goes into successfully selling your home, from listing at the right time to hiring the right agent. But there’s one asset you might not have thought of that can make or break your home sale—and that’s the right photos.

recent article in the Washington Post explored the importance of photos in the home selling process, and the results were astounding. The article, which examined data from various real estate sources (including the National Association of Realtors®TruliaRedfin, and real estate photography company VHT), found that 87% of buyers relied on photos to help them make a decision on a home, and 84% of buyers wouldn’t even consider a property that didn’t have listing photos. While any photos are better than no photos at all, the most benefit comes from professional home photos; professionally photographed homes sell 32% faster—and demand a 47% higher asking price per square foot—than listings without professional photos.

The Takeaway:

If you’ve been thinking about listing your home, photos are a non-negotiable. And if you want your home to sell quickly (and profitably!), you should definitely consider hiring a professional photographer to capture the perfect shots.

Posted by Heather Smith on September 6th, 2019 3:08 PM

Picture this…

There’s an inexperienced real estate agent in your town.

He hasn’t sold any homes yet.

He wants to drum up some business.

So, he climbs up onto your roof and paints what he estimates to be the value of your home.

He feels like this could be a win-win:

YOU get to know the value of your house, so he was helpful to you, without even having to meet with him…

… and HE gets to show you how that he knows his stuff. Hopefully you’ll turn to him for help once you want to sell your home.

But you’re kind of ticked off, aren’t you?

First off, this guy painted on your roof. That’s just vandalism.

Beyond that, he wasn’t even close to accurate! The value he painted up there is tens of thousands of dollars off.

He didn’t even see inside your home

You notice he did the same thing to all the other houses in the area.

He seems off on the value of all of them.

It’s still kind of intriguing, though, because you’re like, “Hmm, I always felt like Bill’s place was worth less than mine. Looks like I was right. But there’s no way Gary’s house is worth more than mine, that agent is craaaazy. Unless maybe Gary did some major remodeling inside…”

But how would the agent know? He never even went inside your neighbor’s house. Or your house. Or anyone else’s house.

He just eyeballed everyone’s house from outside, and took a quick peek at some data available to the public. Then slapped his estimate up on your roof for everyone to see.

His estimates are all over the place. Some high. Some low. Once in a while he seems to be somewhat in the ballpark.

His “value” affects your actual value

Beside the fact that this guy vandalized your roof, now you have people sizing up the value of your home based upon a number he came up with, without even seeing inside your home.

It was careless and thoughtless.

He lacked respect for your privacy, your equity, and ultimately your wealth. The value of your home can now be viewed by anyone, for whatever reason they feel.

It would be even worse if you were in the middle of trying to sell your home, and now you have buyers pulling up, seeing your painted roof, and considering his estimate when (and if) they make an offer.

Can you imagine if a real estate agent actually did this?!

You’d probably want to report him to the police, his real estate broker, the real estate commission… and all of your friends, family and neighbors.

You’d want everyone to know not to trust this guy, or give him any business.

Online valuation sites are basically doing this to you

You’ve probably seen or heard about websites where you can look up the value of your house (or anyone else’s house) for free.

It seems great because there’s no need to even talk to a real estate agent. Just pop in the address, and voila, you get to see the value of the home.

You might figure that it’s super accurate, since they use fancy algorithms and stuff.

However, these online real estate valuation sites are all basically painting a number on your roof, without ever having gone inside, and without ever having sold a house. And they’re definitely not experts in your local market.

Unfortunately, there isn’t much you can do about it.

They’re using public data to come up with their estimates. They didn’t steal anything. They didn’t actually paint on your roof (they just hover a value over it digitally).

They post disclaimers about their accuracy (or lack thereof), at least if you really, really look for them.

Plus, who would you even report them to anyway?!

Start valuing real estate agents’ values

The thing is, these sites exist because people tend to like them, and look at them. They wouldn’t exist if people didn’t continue to click on them. But people do.

They certainly are convenient, and entertaining, even if they are not accurate.

Many people just don’t want to deal with real estate agents, until and unless they have to. But that’s actually what you should be doing if you want an accurate value of your home.

Great real estate agents take a lot of time and pride in estimating the value of a home. This is not something you can do remotely by simply reviewing public data and algorithms.

In order to be accurate, even a local real estate agent needs to see inside of your home.

So, instead of encouraging these online valuation sites to exist, by visiting their sites and clicking around…

…click on a local real estate agent’s site, and invite him or her in to take a look at your house, and come up with an accurate value.

Don’t rely on an online valuation.

And, whenever possible, spread the word about the inaccuracy of these online valuations because they can affect the perceived value of your home… and beyond. And they will exist as long as people continue to pay them any attention.

Pay attention to real estate agents instead.

Posted by Heather Smith on August 22nd, 2019 2:17 PM
The success of HGTV and the plethora of online information has shifted the ground rules of real estate sales
BY JUNE 16, 2019

Any seller who has not sold a home in the past five years is in for a shock: Everything they thought they knew about selling a home has changed.

Sellers who do not understand the new rules of engagement can easily make costly mistakes and jeopardize their chances of a sale.

3 fundamental changes

These three changes have altered the homebuying and selling landscape forever.

Change 1: The advent of HGTV

Buyers spend countless hours watching HGTV and have developed extremely refined tastes. They know what they want and when they look at homes for sale. They are looking for properties that look similar to what they have seen and liked on TV.

Change 2: The advent of mobile devices and HD internet connectivity

Buyers used to have to visit a home to add or remove it from their short list. No longer the case, today’s sellers have between seven and 10 seconds to sell their home, and those seconds are on a mobile device anywhere on the planet — not in any home for sale.

If a buyer does not like an online listing, they will move on to the next home in a heartbeat and will usually not come back to review.

If they do not like what they see on their device, they will never waste their time visiting in person.

Change 3: The advent of internet real estate sites

Realtor.com, Zillow, Trulia and a host of broker-owned sites have populated the internet with user-friendly websites that provide property data, historical facts, HD pictures, automated valuations, neighborhood and school info, and more.

They have completely removed the need for buyers to visit in person to determine if they like a home. Once a buyer has shortlisted available inventory, they only visit the select few they like.

These three changes have not only revolutionized the way buyers search for and view prospective homes, they have transformed what they buy as well. Historically, there were three groups of buyers:

Top-tier buyers: Willing to pay a premium, this group looked for move-in ready homes that had all the amenities they were looking for.

Middle-tier buyers: Looking for homes in “original” condition, this group hoped to get a decent price and then improve the home over time with sweat equity.

Bottom-tier buyers: This third group were contractors and flippers looking for distressed properties they could buy for 60 percent to 70 percent of retail value.

The middle tier, which historically represented a significant percentage of market sales, is disappearing. More comfortable with tech than construction, today’s buyers are forgoing the middle tier en masse and paying more to obtain move-in-ready homes that look like the finished properties they have seen on HGTV.

This is not simply the consequence of real estate-related technologies. The past few years have seen sweeping societal shifts as homebuyer wannabes, for many reasons, are less willing or even capable of fixing up a home they’ve purchased.

They know exactly what they like when they see it, but have almost no idea how to produce it themselves. The No. 1 question buyers ask about our listings is, “Can we buy the staging?”

With buyers moving away from “original condition” properties they perceive as needing upgrades, homes that appear in the middle tier are being forced down into the bottom tier and need to be priced accordingly. Sellers who do not understand this new reality stand to end up with far less than they imagined.

5 seller myths

With this in mind, here are the top five seller beliefs that are no longer true:

1. I do not need to have the listing agent visit until my home is ready.

Wrong. In reality, the sooner the agent can get in, the better. Sellers, assuming the old rules still apply, might spend money on things that could harm a home’s potential and, conversely, fail to spend money where it matters.

Agents can not only help sellers maximize their potential, but they can also connect them with the trades and other professionals required to do it right.

2. I do not need to upgrade the property for sale.

Since increasing numbers of buyers are looking for move-in ready homes, the more a seller does to get the home to that level, the higher the returns. In an up market, sellers can reap a $2-$3 dollar return for every dollar spent.

In a declining market, they may not get 100 percent back, but they will get a sale. I frequently hear sellers ask, “Why should I upgrade? Won’t the new buyers come in and rip out all the stuff I just put in?”

That is not the right question. A better question is, “What can I do to make my online pictures sizzle to get the highest number of buyers through the front door regardless of what a buyer does once they own the home?”

If a seller can invest $1,000 on carpets and in the process make $3,000, does it matter what the new owner does once they move in?

3. I need open houses to sell my home.

The myth here is that buyers need to visit your home in person to decide whether they like it or not. In the new reality, buyers are visiting because they have already seen the home online and decided it was worth seeing in person.

Open houses simply make it easier for buyers who are already going to visit to actually get in. They also make it easy for the neighbors to come through — which is good because they frequently know someone looking to move into the area.

4. I need many open house signs at multiple key intersections.

Wrong again. Savvy listing agents put out tons of signs because they are free advertising. Buyers who have seen the home online do not need directional signs to find the home. With open houses dates and times syndicating to all the major web portals, buyers simply use the GPS feature in their phones.

As for the neighbors, they will not come because you posted signs at far away intersections. To get them, you want signs close to the open house.

5. If buyers really want my house, they will pay more than market value.

Buyers are not running charities. Due to online AVMs (automated valuation models — think Zestimate), buyers know when a property is overpriced and generally stay away, assuming the seller is unrealistic.

While pricing strategies vary from region to region, most agents know to recommend that sellers price listings close to market realities. As more listings come onto the market, buyers have more choices and migrate toward those they believe represent good values.

Sellers who insist they must net a specific amount, which in turn pushes the price too high, are only kidding themselves.

For sellers who have not sold a home in recent years, the new rules can be a shock. Ironically, since most sellers are also looking to buy a replacement home, all I usually have to do to change their thinking is to ask them how they are personally searching for homes in their new location.

They walk me through their process, and suddenly, in most cases, they get it.

Carl Medford is the CEO of The Medford Team.

Article image credited to Joe Belanger / Shutterstock.com

Article Link: https://www.inman.com/2019/06/16/5-outdated-seller-beliefs-agents-should-debunk/?unl=3b1c675869f2ef8c0f1c4508b3473a6e04514608&utm_source=referral&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=sharedarticle 

Posted by Heather Smith on August 15th, 2019 1:40 PM

Before you list your home, you want to feel confident in the market and the opportunity to sell your property at a competitive price. And in Q2 2019, it looks like that confidence is on the rise.

According to the most recent Homeownership Opportunities and Market Experience (HOME) Survey from the National Association of REALTORS®, nearly ¾ of people—73 percent—believe that now is a good time to sell a home. That’s up from 65 percent last quarter (Q1 2019), a jump of 12 percent. The percentage of people who are strongly optimistic that now is a good time to sell is also on the rise, increasing from 37 percent to 46 percent.

The Takeaway

The jump in optimism points to favorable market conditions for sellers. So if you’ve been thinking about selling your home, now is a great time to make a move.

Posted by Heather Smith on July 12th, 2019 9:01 PM

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